Allie Mombourquette Lights Up Rue St.-Jean for Qc Celtic Festival

Allie Mombourquette Lights Up Rue St.-Jean for Qc Celtic Festival
Allie Mombourquet on the McAuslan stage on Rue St. Jean

Allie Mombourquet on the McAuslan stage on Rue St. Jean

I don’t expect you’d know who Allie Mombourquet was before you’d heard her fiddle on the streets of the Vieux Québec tonight. Truth be told, I don’t fully expect you’d know her name after either, but this young Cape Breton fiddler is worth remembering the name of, if Celtic music is your thing.

Invited to Québec City from her native Nova Scotia for now the second time, Allie Mombourquette is no stranger to the stage. Having first come to our fair city to play alongside Natalie MacMaster two years ago, Allie Mombourquette headlined her own “ceilidh”, or informal musical gathering, just outside the Pub St. Alexandre as party of the 8th annual Quebec City Celtic Festival.

The Celtic Festival aims to reconnect Québécois with their heavily Celtic origins, often forgotten in our nation’s social history. However, listening to Mombourquette’s violin is far too reminiscent of traditional rigodons and traditional “French Canadian” music to deny the obvious Celtic influences at the root of both her Cape Breton style and our own music. A ceilidh being, by definition, an informal jam session, Mombourquette didn’t hesitate to call on new friends she’d only met half an hour ago to provide additional musical support, first on her stage outside Pub St-Alexandre and later within Pub St-Patrick’s Irish musical alcove – where this article is currently being written over a pint and good company.

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The evening continued at Pub St. Patrick and ended well into the morning

Be sure to keep an eye on both Allie Mombourquette and the Quebec City Celtic Festival if Celtic music and culture pulls your heart strings. There’s a lot more coming from both.

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Farnell Morisset, LifeinQuebec.com Staff Writer

Categories: News

About Author

Farnell Morisset

Farnell Morisset is passionate about discussing (among other things) the issues of modern social identity for many Québécois who, like him, feel deeply connected to the Québécois nation and culture yet do not identify with the traditional francophone non-practicing Catholic nationalist image. He has an engineering degree from Université Laval and is currently a law student at McGill University.

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