Dear Shop Owners – Turn Down That AC!

Dear Shop Owners – Turn Down That AC!

It’s 28 degrees outside… and I’m shivering.

No, I’m not taken with some horrible summer virus.  I just happen to be in one of the many shops of the city that cranks up its air condition during the summer.  Dear shop owners – please stop doing that.

On the surface, I can understand the logic – one of the beauties of modern creature comforts is that it’s possible to keep a coffee shop, restaurant, or grocery store at the same temperature year-round, regardless of the biting cold or sweltering heat outside.  However, just because we can keep our indoor spaces at 20 degrees Celsius year-round, doesn’t mean we should.

We comfort-seeking human beings, you see, are remarkably adaptive creatures.  Our bodies, if given the chance, are able to acclimatise to a very wide range of temperatures.  This is why the same 5-degree temperature feels chillingly cold near the end of fall, but surprisingly warm at the beginning of spring.

So, dear owners, please consider cutting back on that air-conditioning in summer.  20 degrees might be a nice and cozy temperature in the dead of winter, but when it’s 30 degrees outside, your shops feel like I’m sitting in a refrigerator.  What little my body has gotten used to the warmer temperatures outside now make your inside temperatures uncomfortably chilly, especially in my lighter summer clothes.  What’s more, if I stay in your shop long enough for my body to get used to your unnaturally cool setting, as soon as I step back outside, it feels as if I’ve walked in to an oven.

Dear shop owners, when it’s 30 degrees outside, I will be very comfortable at 25 degrees in your establishment.  It will make me much more comfortable, save you money, and even help the environment.  So go ahead and turn down at AC!

Categories: Opinion

About Author

Farnell Morisset

Farnell Morisset is passionate about discussing (among other things) the issues of modern social identity for many Québécois who, like him, feel deeply connected to the Québécois nation and culture yet do not identify with the traditional francophone non-practicing Catholic nationalist image. He has an engineering degree from Université Laval and is currently a law student at McGill University.

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