The “Treaty of Paris” coming to Québec

The “Treaty of Paris” coming to Québec

treaty of Paris 1763 MAP

It was signed in 1763 by Spain, Portugal, France and Great Britain and changed the face of North America forever; in fact, Canada is what it is today mostly because of this treaty.

The Treaty, (also known as the Treaty of 1763) actually put an end to the Seven Years War which had been going on between the four countries over certain land claims around the globe.  It finally resolved the dispute as to who would control the land referred to at the time as Nouvelle France, or Rupert’s land. The treaty gave parts of North America to Great Britain and Spain, with France holding onto the south western end of what today is Louisiana.

The actual document itself has never left the archives of the “Ministère des Affaires Etrangères” in Paris and there has been a lot of talk over the last three years if it should actually be shown in public. The preferred date for the exhibit would have been in 2013 marking the 250 year anniversary, but red tape and security concerns slowed the process.

It will finally see the light of day here in Quebec City in September of this year at the Musée de la Civilisation de Québec (MCQ). To see it will require reservations and will only be seen by small groups for a period of 45 minutes. It is a precious historical document that changed the world forever and still causes controversy in some countries to this day. It is why the Spanish language is prevalent in southwestern United States, why the east coast speaks predominately English and why Québec speaks mostly French; a very important piece of paper indeed.

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Life in Québec staff writer

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